Tag Archives: job hunting

3 Interview Mistakes No Company Should Make

Quick note: As you’ll see if you note the date of the “What Sam Wore” at the bottom of the post, I wrote this back in March. I held off posting, though, because I was worried it might be too sour-grapes, fresh off the interview process, but more than half a year later, I feel like it’s still worth a publish

Before I jumped in to the job market last year, I read a lot about preparedness and protocol. Did you know that using Times New Roman on your résumé is “the typeface equivalent of wearing sweatpants to an interview?” Have you considered how you’d answer the newest brain-busting interview questions? Bullet points! Elevator speeches! The right interview outfits! I clicked through way too many stories and slideshows about how to impress recruiters.

After a few early interviews, though, I reframed my mindset to include this incredibly important component: What were these recruiters doing to impress me? I’m great at what I do; my skills are stellar, impressive and wide-ranging. Most companies would be lucky to have me on board. If I’m bringing this much to the table, the company’s recruiters and interviewers should, too.

Job hunting and dating have a lot in common: You’re dressed up, maybe a little nervous, trying to make a great impression on someone. In dating, each person’s opinion of the relationship is equally significant and either one has the power to call something off. Well-qualified candidates treat job hunting the same way. (After all, my goal wasn’t to land any old job in my field, but to land a better one than I had.)

People tell their friends and families about what happened on their bad dates, and stories about bad workplace experiences get out, too, via sites like Glassdoor as well as through word of mouth. In each of my more atrocious job-hunting ordeals, the recruiter or interviewer had done something that would’ve been a surefire dating deal-breaker.

shut-it-down-dealbreaker

Let’s get specific, with three real-life examples of why I decided companies weren’t good workplaces: Continue reading